Encourage A Child booksMiscellenea

Audrey Driscoll reviews “Encourage A Child To Watch Birds”

Audrey Driscoll, author of The Herbert West series of novels, takes a peak inside my new book. 

“I’m not a birdwatcher, except in the sense of noticing who’s hanging around the bird feeders in the back garden. I don’t have a life list, nor even a decent pair of binoculars. And as can be seen from the photo below, I’m not that great at taking pictures of birds either. (That blurry shape is a robin (American type) landing on a cotoneaster bush full of berries. Robins have been feasting on those berries for the past week.)

American robin

“Despite the above, I like birds, and I’m keen on helping out the ones that live around here. A pair of Bewick’s Wrens nested in an old shoe on my back porch in 2015. So I hope that gives me some credibility for this book review.

“This is a short, well-organized and clearly written book intended for adults with a child or children in their lives.”

“Its main intent is to help them develop an interest in observing and learning about birds in the natural environment. The introduction specifies that the suggested activities are screen-free, and this is true, although internet resources are mentioned peripherally. Otherwise, each chapter takes the child and adult companion outside to experience birds in a variety of ways.

“Ten chapters, or “Ideas, start with the most basic activities – looking at birds in parks, gardens, and urban environments – and progress to relatively advanced projects, such as keeping detailed notes on bird observations, or dissecting owl pellets to investigate owl diets!

Topics include buying binoculars, obtaining books about birds, learning to recognize birds’ songs and calls, and setting up bird feeding stations. Each one is dealt with in simple, clear language. The author’s introduction says it’s not necessary to follow up the ideas in the order presented, or even to work through them all. The reader is encouraged to respect the child’s interests and use the book accordingly.

Projects to do. Questions to ask

“Each Idea provides basic facts about the topic, summing up with a list of projects to do together and questions that may be asked to help focus the child’s attention on details. It’s clear that this book is intended for people who are eager to spend time with children and act as guides and resources. This is not a book for someone looking to send kids off to amuse themselves.

“The author points out how the bird-related activities may kindle other interests in children, such as photography, drawing, writing, music, even astronomy. Observing birds may present opportunities for using math skills, or discussing life-and-death issues such as the fact that some birds kill and eat other birds. The broader topics of conservation and environmental issues may also be approached.

“The language is clear and the formatting excellent. In keeping with the “non-screen” approach, the reader is encouraged to use their public library as a resource for books and other materials. Many of the birds mentioned specifically are those of the UK and western Europe, but the book is intended for readers anywhere in the world, referencing organizations and resources specific to North America and Australia.”

“Altogether, this is an excellent book for anyone who wants to introduce children to birds and the outdoors, and even to learn more about these things themselves.” 

Encourage A Child To Watch Birds by Denzil WAlton

Thanks Audrey! Visit the Encourage A Child website to discover more information about my book and where to buy it. The book is available in three formats:

  • Mobi format for a Kindle
  • ePub format for eReaders
  • PDF to read on a computer

Audrey Driscoll’s books are described on her website. The Herbert West series was inspired by H.P. Lovecraft’s six serialized stories published in 1922.

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8 replies »

    • Yes, Audrey did a great job isolating the key objectives of the book and seeing it from a non-birdwatcher’s perspective.

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