Category: Flanders Fields

Flanders Fields – the area of Flanders where the Allied armies dug in against the invading Germans in the First World War – is known throughout the world. It’s a symbol of the needless suffering and devastation caused by war. But it’s more than a symbol. It’s an area where people lived and still live today. Here are some posts that put the spotlight on this fascinating area of Belgium.

Tyne Cot

Originally posted on The life of B:
The largest Commonwealth military cemetery in the world is called Tyne Cot, and is a 10minute drive (or 2hour walk) from the centre of Ypres in Belgium. In 1917 however it took months of battling in horrendous weather for the allies…

Shells from First World War

Memorial Museum Passchendaele 1917

The Memorial Museum Passchendaele 1917 is dedicated to the horrendous bloodbath that was the Battle of Passchendaele. It displays numerous artefacts from the battle, a Dugout Experience that takes you underground into a mock-up of the British Army’s quarters, and reconstructions of trenches.

Flanders Fields reconstruction after Armistice 1918

Armistice Day 1918: What Happened Next?

Armistice Day 1918 marked the end of the First World War. We tend to think “phew, that was that!” and believe that people could finally get “back to normal”. But to the Flemish returning to Flanders Fields, they were greeted by desolation and danger. It marked the start of a huge clear-up of the devastated landscape.

War and Trauma exhibitions

A post with a difference today. But still within the theme of “discovering Belgium”. I would like to draw your attention to a double exhibition called War and Trauma taking place in Ghent and Ypres that focuses on the physical and mental consequences of war, from the First […]